Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Another Emergency at Byron Illinois Nuclear; Winds Blowing Towards Chicago

The Byron Illinois nuclear plant once again had another emergency declaration due to the loss of off site power. Unsurprisingly information is limited, but as of this morning the site is still generating power at 99%. Given that the reactor has not yet SCRAMMED, the situation bares monitoring. If a reactor SCRAM does occur, precautions would be wise.

Currently both surface and Jet Stream winds are blowing from Byron, Il towards Chicago. Should a SCRAM or radioactive release occur, consider monitoring the wind maps shown below; these maps indicate the current wind directions and auto update themselves every time the page is reloaded or refreshed.

The NRC Event report for the current situation is Event Number: 47708 on 2/29/2012; please note that the NRC has apparently changed its http: linking nomenclature, as a result today's direct link (above) to event 47708 will point somewhere else in the future.  For historical purposes you may search for the Event 47708 (2/29/2012) at this link. http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/event-status/event/

Surface Winds

Jet Stream

2 comments:

  1. We just had another blizzard here in N. Utah. According to Radnet the radioactivity was in the 60's during this intense storm. An hour later now, 12:50 MST Mar 2 2012 and it has dropped into the 40's. I'd love to know what's in our snow! I'm old enough to well remember the open air atomic testing and realize that the levels are not all that worrisome as reported on Radnet, but what about the snow itself? From what I observe on your site would it be safe for kids to go out and play in the snow tomorrow?

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  2. Radnet "reviews and approves" their "data"; they won't publish the raw data. Radnet IS censored data.

    During the first snow storms of the year we noticed ambient background radiation sustaining over 2x background during and after the snow falls; we did not let our children out in that snow.

    Generally we try and avoid all precipitation, we make a case by case assessment of each snow fall to decide if we let our children play in the snow after the precipitation has ended

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